Tag Archives: central florida

“Get Local” Your Newest Travel Buddy in Central Florida

Photo Credit: Get Local
Photo Credit: Get Local

Nothing compares to visiting a new place like a local. The killer food, the friendly conversation, and the opportunity to peek into the lives of others is something that tourists the world over are demanding. Living in an area dominated by Disney, Universal, and the others, to a one time visitor might seem that’s all there is to Central Florida. But like with any tourist destination, there is a local population that loves to live beyond the football field parking lots and nightly firework shows. But jumping into a city to get the local experience can be overwhelming and most definitely terrifying. Trey Dyer and Mike Black have solved that issue by starting Get Local.

High school friends and Central Florida natives, Trey and Mike grew up fishing, wakeboarding, surfing and taking advantage of the thousands of outdoor activities the region has to offer. After dating a pair of cousins, the two grew to become very close friends. When Mike (a University of Florida alum) decided to fulfill his dream of backpacking across Asia by leaving his accounting gig, Trey (an American University alum) was supportive and joined him in Vietnam. In Vietnam, the Florida boys went beyond the tourist stops on the map and traveled with a local guide named Ju Hai. They were so moved by this experience that immediately they started to think about how they could replicate this experience and become the Sherpas of Central Florida.

Since Mike’s return in May of this year, Trey and Mike have been hard at work launching Get Local. Using their personal experiences and recommendations from trusted friends, Mike and Trey have partnered with local businesses. Through these partnerships, they offer packages online and help drive traffic to these local spots. Ranging from paddle boarding and airboat rides to guided tours and art galleries, the duo are capturing what really sets Central Florida life apart from anywhere else.

Mike Black in China
Mike Black in China

While the serious upside to starting a boutique travel business is curating the experiences, the greatest challenge the duo faces is the aspect of self-promotion. As both members are working from home, the lakes they live on can be incredible sources of inspiration as well as distraction. “We’re just staring at this body of water that begs to be fished, or paddle boarded on, or wakeboarded on, all day. Right now, we’re just paying our dues to set the right foundation for the business,” said Trey.

Trey Dyer
Trey Dyer

Their approach to building the business is truly millennial. With a strong social media presence inspired by their travels abroad, Trey and Mike are living their dreams. But, what do they think is the greatest drawback for our generation? Trey believes that “our biggest drawback is how connected we are to the superficial things in life. It keeps us from really connecting to the world around us.” According to Mike, “We have a hard time focusing. It’s too hard to focus on one thing at a time because there are so many things to do and we are constantly entertained. But that is also something great, because it is pushing us to be better and greater.”

On the flip side, what excites these two about being members of the Millennial Generation? In Trey’s opinion, “We are already the ones trying to fix what our future problems are going to be. We aren’t waiting around for them to kind of take over.” For Mike, “our generation’s greatest attribute is that we are rebellious, not accepting of typical career paths, and that is allowing us to see a lot more of the world. We aren’t about please me, cater to me. We are more about show me who you are, be authentic, be real. It’s a healthier way to live and will serve us well in the future.”

Until the day Get Local is nationwide, those in Central Florida can access their services by going here. In the comments below, we’d like to hear about your favorite Central Florida experience or a time travel has inspired you to do something different.

Trey and Family to the Left  Mike and Family to the Right
Trey and Family to the Left
Mike and Family to the Right

All photos courtesy of Get Local

My Take on Central Florida’s Commuter Train – Sunrail

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It’s finally here!! After years of negotiating, being used as a political chess piece and deprived of federal funding the Sunrail is finally a running functioning commuter train. Last Friday, I rode it for the first time from the Winter Park Station to Church Street Station. Although there is plenty of room for improvement, overall it was FAR less stressful than driving and I plan to take it again in the future. Sunrail, here is my constructive feedback:

Things I loved

    • It’s sooooo cheap –  I paid $3.75 roundtrip, a fraction of the cost of parking in a garage downtown.
    • It’s so clean – Yes, I know it’s new, but I guess I was expecting litter or spill stains.
    • It makes you happier to ride it – In other cities you are traveling underground so you can actually see what you are passing.
    • It saves you from having to find parking … and then losing your car – Finding parking in Orlando can set off a minor heart attack. Then losing your white car in the huge parking lot can ruin any good day.
    • You are around people – driving in your car is a very solitary activity. It’s great for some alone time, but there aren’t a lot of opportunities in the Central Florida area where you feel like you are a member of a larger community.

Things that need improvement

  • Collecting fares To purchase a ticket, you go to a kiosk and use your debit or credit card. No cash option is a barrier, especially for tourists. Then, you have to find a cute yellow box to the left or right of the kiosk and tap your ticket before and after you board the train. The unmanned station, the lack of partitions makes for plenty of opportunities to grab a free ride. Admittedly, I had no clue how it worked so I didn’t tap in for my ride to Church Street. Small a request – have that friendly voice on the loud speaker go over those directions or have them written so people can actually pay for the service.
  • That good awful siren – that horrible fire drill sound had me looking for the nearest exit off the outdoor platform, until I realized that the train was approaching. A friendly voice announcing the arrival of the train might be enough and less torture on the ear drums.
  • Pedestrian walkways – moving large numbers of people around safely is one thing. If we are being encouraged to forgo our cars, more pedestrian crossings, especially when leaving the station, should be put a bit higher on the priority list.
  • Frequency – I understand that this is just the beginning, but trains have got to be running more often if you want community buy in. I had to wait 20 minutes on my way to Church Street and 30 minutes on my way back. If I had a tight schedule, I wouldn’t even consider taking the Sunrail.
  • It doesn’t run at night – The last train leaves Church Street at 9:25 pm. If you are going to a concert, a basketball game, or any other event, it’s not an option and a it is a missed revenue opportunity.

Have you ridden the Sunrail? Have you enjoyed the experience? Have I missed any areas of improvement? Comment below or tweet to @themtakeover.