Tag Archives: career

Why Millennials Won’t Be Defeated

Today’s blog post is the 50th! And as a testament to the true mission of the blog, promoting snake people, I mean millennials, who are creating impact in our world, over the last couple of days there have been several articles that heaped on the fears and doubts if any millennial hoping to live a happy life. For example, this Vice News video does an overview of how our economy is changing. By the end of it, the expert panel paint a patchwork economy vastly different from the one we’ve prepared for. I closed the tab feeling a sense of dread for this “new” economy and fear that I have played all the wrong cards during my 20’s.

After taking a sip of my white wine and some deep breathing, I realized that the fear and panic I was experiencing  was inherited baggage from our older generations. The rate at which things are changing, it is absolutely terrifying and creating a panic across all of society. Think of it this way, 7 years ago the first Iphone was premiered and fundamentally changed the way we use phones. Now, everyone has a smartphone and are using them to make money. Millennials are perfectly poised to capitalize on all of these changes for the following reasons:

1. We are young.

Youth

Although I often feel as if I’m 45 and I’ve figured everything, there’s a greater sense of relief that I have at least 30 years to correct my life’s course. This also applies to my peers,  what ever past mistakes we have made we have plenty of time to make our way to a life that works for us. Having that much time is a very precious gift that our parents would often kill for. As my roommate always says, “Most successful people started from a different place than  where they are now.”

2. We are creative.

Creativity

Never have we had the opportunity to express ourselves in mediums beyond the classical arts. So keep working those Insta filters, embracing your creative side not only improves your mental health, but the future economy will heavily rely on out of the box thinking and doing more with less.

3. We’re resourceful.

Resourceful

Yes, the Great Recession was terrible, I lived in Florida at the time, I can tell you stories. The dramatic shift of a spend happy middle class to one losing houses and jobs which lead to feeling, and still dealing with, the pinch of stagnant wages and rising costs. Whether we’re building money saving apps or embracing the DIY instructions from Pintrest, we’re finding ways to save here and there.  Creating that kind of value is what our future economy demands, and millennials have completely embraced it.

4. We are thirsty for knowledge.

Knowledge

Cited as the most educated generation , our incessant consumption of media demonstrates leads one to believe there is a strong desire for knowledge.  According to this Entrepreneur article, millennials spend 18 hours consuming media material.

 5. We are strategic.
Strategic

With the rise of Postmates, Uber, Lyft and, others, millennials have found ways to create an income that funded by a variety of sources, and have time to socialize. Making the world work for us will be critical as we cope with this rapidly shifting economy.

The Takeaway?
So the next time you are faced with the inevitable millennial tear down, take the time to sit back and identify all of the ways you’re getting ready to handle the quickly shifting economy. No other generation will be ready like we are for this evolving economy, no matter what it ends up looking like.

Life: It’s Like an Outdoor Shower

They say that in times of transition that we learn the most about ourselves. I think its mostly because we are caught in our most vulnerable state, like bathing in an outdoor shower. You’re outside, so its out of your (and society’s) comfort zone and feels a bit risque, but yet so nice to bask in your vulnerability. The more you let go and enjoy the freedom, the closer you dance with the danger of being caught by a passersby, or unsuspecting comrade. If you are caught in this excruciatingly mortifying predicament, you find yourself making a crash landing back to reality and become acutely aware of your surroundings. Once you recover from complete mortification, you try to grasp at whatever reverie you were in because you were on the brink of some wonderful revelation.

That whole process, though painful for the psyche and the accidental Peeping Tom, is how I have sort of felt after each transition: graduating from college, graduating from graduate school, and accepting the fact that I was unhappy with where my life was, etc. I would find myself lost in the calamity that is the ending of a phase, only to be left with the acute awareness of the beauty and the foul nature of our reality. For example, when I completed graduate school I was completely overwhelmed with the opportunities and the deeply held belief that I could single-handedly be involved in “saving the world,” but I was also overwhelmed by the possibility of becoming a complete failure left to live off the streets for the rest of my days.

But as I have been navigating this current transition, the quote from the great philosopher Epictetus continues to come to mind: It is not what happens to you, but how you react that matters. You’ve gotta trust a man that was once a slave, then became a philosopher, and then was banished when it comes to dealing with life’s challenges… and if he was able to focus on the present, then why can’t I?

I, as well as the rest of my type-A peers, get so wrapped up in “the plan” and when things don’t follow it exactly, we feel like the world is crashing in on our outdoor shower. How have we let ourselves see these “bumps in the road” as negative and wrong, when really – it’s just life? If we just embraced ourselves —childhood battle scars, muffin tops, and all— for who we are, would we be able to see through these catastrophes and see them for what they are: unfortunate events? Well, while you scramble for a towel, I’m going to practice flaunting and celebrating the spontaneous for it is a practiced skill, not a talent.

Pictures from: 

http://www.heroicstoic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Epictetus-Feature-1000×288.jpg

http://homedecorremodeling.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/wooden-wild-jungle-outdoor-shower-design-ideas.jpg

The Wall Finally Broke: The Lessons I Learned From Failing

Last week, I learned about the law of attraction and how if you put something out into the universe, the universe will respond. Now, I totally thought this was a load of bull because, let’s be real, we are the masters of our own destiny …. right? Well, a couple Tuesdays ago I was lamenting to a friend of mine about how depleted I felt because I was so miserable at my job. I equated it to banging my head against a wall and the wall was showing no sign of damage nor was it causing enough pain that it would force me to stop. It was only a matter of time until one of them did. The next day, my boss called me in for a heart to heart. By the end of the conversation and a parting of ways was settled upon. Day after that, I happened upon a free week long teleconference by Christine Hassler that brought together experts on how to “upgrade” the various aspects of your life.

Call it coincidence or call it the power of the law of attraction, either way I found myself recuperating from the all too common challenge that all people, especially 20-somethings face: failure. Learning how to overcome and build back better from failure is crucial to succeeding in life, especially for those of us who aspire to be influential in this world. It is not enough to have excellent ideas or develop a beautiful vision, but truly successful leaders know how to learn from failing. I have seen this advice given by several thought leaders, and often thought about how that could possibly relate to me.

Reflecting back on my professional experience, I realized that I struggled to bring the best version of myself to work and allowed myself to fall into a vortex of misery and whining. I avoided making new friends and focused solely on how I was stuck in this awful situation with no solution. As awful as it was, I can now say I learned so much about myself and what parameters I need to be successful.  Some of those parameters are: a supportive and positive work environment, the sun (I guess you really can’t take Florida out of the girl), and the ability to connect with diverse cultures.

What about you? How did you overcome a failure and what lessons did you learn from that experience? What are some parameters that you need to be successful?